SD 22 Brooklyn (Bay Ridge-Bath Beach-Marine Park)

District 22, Brooklyn (Bay Ridge-Bath Beach-Marine Park)

Published: 
August 2018

Welcome to this special election issue of Tenant/Inquilino.

Many crucial issues about New York City housing are determined at the state level, from the strength of our rent-regulation laws to funding for public housing. Therefore, we have taken the step of sending questionnaires to all candidates for governor, lieutenant governor, and for the state Senate in the 20 districts with the highest numbers of rent-regulated tenants.

The primaries will be held on Thursday, Sept. 13, and the general election Tuesday, Nov. 6.
Find your polling place here: https://nyc.pollsitelocator.com/search

 


Martin Golden, incumbent—Republican, Conservative, Independence

Ross Barkan—Democrat

Andrew Gounardes—Democrat, Working Families, Women's Equality, Reform


Martin Golden, incumbent—Republican, Conservative, Independence

https://martygolden.org/

What is your position on rent regulation, what work have you done in the past to further that position, and if elected, what would you do in 2019?

I support the existing rent regulations. In the past I have worked with tenant droups to organize buildings, and my office has worked with tenants to secure their rights under existing laws.

What do you believe is the biggest issue facing the New York City Housing Authority, and how would you address it?

The biggest problem facing NYCHA is a management culture that is responsible for the present failures. Since the city has been unable to manage NYCHA, I would support the federal monitor and/or placing NYCHA under the authority of the state Homes and Community Renewal agency.

Do you believe that there is a need for more affordable housing in New York, and if so, what would you do to meet that need?

There is a need for affordable housing, especially for seniors. I would support legislation expanding existing programs that offer incentives for affordable-housing construction.

What would you do to address the homelessness in New York State?

While more affordable housing is part of the answer, there is also a need to provide services to those in shelters. That's why I sponsored S.8305/A.9566, a joint bill to establish “culturally competent” short-term safe-house residential facilities and long-term safe-house residential facilities and services operated by not-for-profit agencies for survivors of human trafficking. The bill passed both houses and was delivered to the governor on August 13.

What is your position regarding campaign-finance reform?  

I support lowering contribution limits for those doing business with the state, and enhanced disclosure, requiring campaign committees to provide information for contributors similar to that required under federal law. 


Ross Barkan—Democrat

http://rossbarkan.com/

What is your position on rent regulation, what work have you done in the past to further that position, and if elected, what would you do in 2019?

I am a strong supporter of rent regulation and would like to see the program expanded dramatically, eventually moving to a system of universal rent control. We must repeal the vacancy bonus, vacancy decontrol, and stop landlords from exploiting preferential rents. I refuse all money from real-estate developers and the landlord lobby.

What do you believe is the biggest issue facing the New York City Housing Authority, and how would you address it?

Funding. NYCHA needs more than $30 billion in capital repairs. With the federal government failing to help, the state must step up and help fund NYCHA on a scale it once did. NYCHA also needs a change in management.

Do you believe that there is a need for more affordable housing in New York, and if so, what would you do to meet that need?

Yes. I would pressure developers to build far more than 25 percent "affordable" for a rezoning—mandatory inclusionary zoning doesn't go far enough. We need to change the AMI formula to account for the people actually living in the surrounding communities.

What would you do to address the homelessness in New York State?

Housing subsidies, more housing, and universal rent control. The homelessness crisis is a housing crisis. A lot of the homeless can't afford rent. I support Home Stability Support and will fight hard to ensure we move to system where working-class and poor people receive automatic rent subsidies and don't end up in substandard shelter. Housing should be a human right.

What is your position regarding campaign-finance reform?  

I am a staunch supporter of campaign-finance reform. We need public financing of state elections. We must close the LLC loophole and severely limit the size of donations. We must get money out of politics.


Andrew Gounardes—Democrat, Working Families, Women's Equality, Reform

http://www.andrewgounardes.com

What is your position on rent regulation, what work have you done in the past to further that position, and if elected, what would you do in 2019?

I support rent regulation and believe we need to preserve and build more affordable units. If elected I would repeal the Urstadt Law which allows upstate politicians who are in the pockets of the real-estate lobby to have more control over our rent laws than New York City does. I’d also crack down on rent fraud, especially in the J-51 program, where many landlords are not stabilizing their units, although they’re required do so.

What do you believe is the biggest issue facing the New York City Housing Authority, and how would you address it?

NYCHA needs money. The system has been grossly mismanaged to the point of endangering the lives of residents. We must increase our investment in NYCHA, but also hold them accountable to ensure that upgrades and urgent repairs are actually made. Every New Yorker deserves the dignity of having a safe place to call home—it is a discredit to our entire city that NYCHA developments have fallen into such disrepair.

Do you believe that there is a need for more affordable housing in New York, and if so, what would you do to meet that need?

We need more affordable housing. I’m interested in the outcome of the city's pilot program to legalize basement apartments as a way to increase affordable housing. I also support using vacant land as sites for future development, and building over rail yards and lines. Furthermore, I support using tax-based incentive programs to create more affordable housing, but believe that the city and state should require more units of affordable housing per development.

What would you do to address the homelessness in New York State?

NYC’s homelessness spike can be directly correlated with the cutting of a state rental-subsidy program in 2011. As a state senator, I would feverishly work to restore that funding subsidy so that those facing imminent eviction or displacement can get the assistance they need.

What is your position regarding campaign-finance reform?  

The influence of big money has corroded our political system and diluted the voices of individual voters. The first piece of legislation I will introduce when elected is campaign-finance reform to cap contributions and enact public financing—too many politicians are beholden to donors and special interests, prioritizing their needs over those of their constituents. I will reform our campaign-finance laws and change the culture of Albany so voters, not donors, matter most.