SD 18 Brooklyn (Williamsburg-Bushwick-Cypress Hills)

District 18, Brooklyn (Williamsburg-Bushwick-Cypress Hills)

Published: 
August 2018

Welcome to this special election issue of Tenant/Inquilino.

Many crucial issues about New York City housing are determined at the state level, from the strength of our rent-regulation laws to funding for public housing. Therefore, we have taken the step of sending questionnaires to all candidates for governor, lieutenant governor, and for the state Senate in the 20 districts with the highest numbers of rent-regulated tenants.

The primaries will be held on Thursday, Sept. 13, and the general election Tuesday, Nov. 6.
Find your polling place here: https://nyc.pollsitelocator.com/search

 


Julia Salazar—Democrat

Incumbent Martin Malave Dilan (Democrat, Independence) did not respond.


Julia Salazar—Democrat

http://www.salazarforsenate.com

What is your position on rent regulation, what work have you done in the past to further that position, and if elected, what would you do in 2019?

New York’s housing crisis is what inspired me to run. Tenants across my district have faced pressure from rising rents and harassment from landlords. When I was in college, I helped organize my building against an abusive landlord, and if elected, I will continue this fight in Albany. I want to put an end to vacancy decontrol, reduce MCI increases, and end preferential rents. Ultimately we should enact universal rent control across New York.

What do you believe is the biggest issue facing the New York City Housing Authority, and how would you address it?

The biggest issue facing NYCHA is the persistent neglect it has received from all its funding sources. The state ought to increase its funding for NYCHA, so that it can address its very troubling backlog of much-needed repairs. Furthermore, privatization is absolutely not an acceptable solution to NYCHA’s problems; New York’s public housing is a valuable resource, and we need to resist any attempt to auction it off to private developers.

Do you believe that there is a need for more affordable housing in New York, and if so, what would you do to meet that need?

Yes, there is absolutely a need for more affordable housing in New York. I would expand the rent-stabilization laws so that all New Yorkers are protected from rising rents, and seek progressive financing for truly affordable and rent-stabilized new housing construction. I would also end the upzonings and concessions to private developers that accelerate gentrification and displacement.

What would you do to address the homelessness in New York State?

I believe that all New Yorkers have a right to housing, regardless of their income level. In addition to fighting for universal rent stabilization, so that more New Yorkers are not added to the ranks of the housing-insecure by skyrocketing costs, I will fight homelessness by adding truly affordable housing to the city, instead of more “market-rate” apartments or “affordable” housing that is aimed at incomes far higher than the local median income.

What is your position regarding campaign-finance reform?  

I will fight for real campaign-finance reform in New York State, including an end to the LLC loophole that allows corporations and rich donors to skirt limits and transparency by registering LLCs. Ultimately, New York State should adopt a system of public financing for elections, so that electoral offices are accessible to candidates from working-class backgrounds.